On Putting a Welcome Mat Under Your Side Window

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On Putting a Welcome Mat Under Your Side Window

July 1st|Web Design|

Welcome MatThe Bride often coaches me on household security AFTER I’ve gone upstairs to bed. She’ll inquire- “Did you leave a welcome mat under the side window for the burglars?” Her oblique question is meant to tickle my brain and determine if in fact I locked the first floor windows of our house into which any dolt could easily slide.

I nearly always answer “Yes, of course!” in a mannish way. Meanwhile, during a bathroom visit to brush my teeth, I figure out that I should slink downstairs to confirm that I REALLY locked the damn windows.

While I do acknowledge the bride’s point — leaving the welcome mat out for your neighborhood burglars is a bad idea — I take issue with the concept that she knows it will always be the side window, and not the GARAGE window into which burglars will climb. Who says they’ll come to the “right” window where I left the mat?

Aha – exactly my point – neither the Bride  nor I know how they will try to get in!

In her brilliant post about landing page copy writing on CopyBlogger, Roberta Rosenberg (@copywritermaven) writes: “…literally any page of your site or blog is a landing page of a sort. To my mind, every page should be optimized to move your visitor along whatever path you’ve set forth toward a sale, a newsletter or blog subscription, what have you.”

Consider this — EVERY page of your site is as likely to be the entry point for potential customers arriving via search engine queries. My marketing point? Not all visitors use your front door – or home page when entering your website.

Make sure you leave the ‘welcome mat’ out under every window that may lead into your site. Imbue every page with consistent navigation elements and pages that encourage further movement into your site and your points of resolution.

About the Author:

Rick Brown
Rick Brown is a 20+ year veteran of industrial business to business marketing. In 2003, Rick founded NetTrack Marketing based on the critical need manufacturers have to be accessible to buyers and specifiers via the Internet.